STUDIO VISIT | PATRICK WEDER

Swiss born, but undeniably a New Yorker, Patrick Weder operates at the highest level of craftsmanship. A tenured designer with an enviable and growing list of dedicated clients his work is all about materials, precision and time.  Now with a large new shop in Greenpoint, he intends to continue doing what he has always done, and thought the work may be bigger he’s sure the attention to detail will remain constant. 

You moved from Switzerland to New York in the mid 90’s and in your time here have seemingly built everything under the sun. What are your thoughts on how the design scene in New York has evolved over the years?

The craftsmanship has increased dramatically over the years. People pay more attention to details in all they do. Whether it’s a credenza or a cocktail table, it seems like things are being thoroughly thought out. Maybe I will have to start being less detail oriented? It's not possible.

You just moved into a new shop, but you've been working out of Greenpoint for a number of years now. How has your experience been here and what made the time right for making a change?

I love the neighborhood. The new shop was a great opportunity. I was lucky to still find such an amazing space to work in.

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Stylistically I feel like all of your work is very distinctive and totally unique to what you do. In terms of your influences how have you develop your design language over the years and where do you look to for inspiration now?

I have always been inspired by industrial cities. The architecture, engineering, bridges, and elements of steel and concrete. NYC has been a huge influence in my work. It fascinates me to know that nature always find it’s way in these areas. I guess my work reflects this relationship: honoring the organic shapes seen in nature by refining everyday industrial materials.

NYC has been a huge influence in my work. It fascinates me to know that nature always find it’s way in these areas. I guess my work reflects this relationship: honoring the organic shapes seen in nature by refining everyday industrial materials.

With the range of typologies and materials that you work with I think it would be fair to say that you straddle the worlds of design and art. Do you feel like it’s necessary to make a distinction between the two and if so how do you see it?

For me there is no difference. The satisfaction is in the process of creating something from idea to physical object.

Looking towards the future are there any types or scales of project that you’re particularly excited about working on and why?

I’m looking forward to doing some large scale public installations; branching the work out to a larger community and giving back some way.

INTERVIEW BY ISAAC FRIEDMAN-HEIMAN

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MELISSA WALBRIDGE