MINUTE INTERVIEW | CODY HOYT

Cody Hoyt

Cody Hoyt is a Brooklyn-based ceramicist who creates truly one-of-a-kind pieces from his Greenpoint studio. His years spent as a visual artist bring a unique, progressive sensibility to his current work with a new medium. We caught up with Cody to ask him a few questions about his inspiration, process, and the evolution of his craft.

Photo by Danlly Domingo. c 2014

Photo by Danlly Domingo. c 2014

Cody Hoyt's exhibit "Heavy Vessel" at Patrick Parrish

Cody Hoyt's exhibit "Heavy Vessel" at Patrick Parrish


Who / what / where inspires the design and creation of your vessels?

Op Art has always been really magical to me.  Also, lately I've taken a lot of inspiration from textile sources, using tessellating shapes and linear pattern to define a surface as opposed to the totally chaotic feeling of something totally incidental, like a "marbled" surface. 

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Describe your process.

It's too circuitous to describe in a minute interview, but basically consists of cutting up flat materials - cardboard, sheetrock, clay, and assembling the pieces at their edges to create geometric forms between 5" and 30" in height. The cardboard is for modeling, the sheetrock is for making molds for the clay pieces. I spend a lot of time hovering over isometric grid paper blocking out patterns and plotting shapes. 

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What is the most important tool in your studio?

Different cutting tools. Mostly different types of utility knives. I spend almost the entire day with a knife in my hand. 

What's your favorite piece you've made? What makes it special?

Does anyone actually admit to having a favorite piece? I get the most excited about whatever I'm working on at the moment, which seems healthy. What makes something special is the threat of disaster that lurks around the entire time and then the final relief or disappointment after what happens in the kiln.

All Over Pattern Octahedron Vessel

All Over Pattern Octahedron Vessel

All Over Pattern Truncated Tetrahedron Vessel

All Over Pattern Truncated Tetrahedron Vessel

All Over Pattern Octahedron Vessel

All Over Pattern Octahedron Vessel

How has your work changed over time?

I'm developing a closer understanding of my materials and what to expect from them. As a result, I've learned to trust certain aspects of the work and push it to more ambitious places. I try to make things that seem technically totally unreasonable at first. Over the last couple of years there's been an "ebb" where pieces became more tight, clean and technically seamless, and then a "flow" where expression becomes more predominant and formal aspects, intention take priority. 

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